mySugr Diabetes Logbook

Disease Category:
Target Audience:

Recommended
Clinical Effectiveness
3
Functionality
5
Usability
5
80
Version: 3.12
Developer: mySugr Gmbh
Review Date: 2016-02-24
Cost: Free with in-app purchases

Overall App Summary:

MySugr Logbook is a friendly app for patients with diabetes to track their blood glucose throughout the day. The app is a moderate-to-advance level for users of mobile devices. It encourages patient engagement through gamification mechanics, activities and rewards, and by using a ‘monster friend’ to represent their progress. MySugr Logbook benefits from multiple integration features, such as Apple Health, glucose meters, and the ability to sync data for export.

The app will be beneficial primarily for patients looking to use an app to help estimate their A1c scores based on daily measurements of SMBG. That being the case, this app is focused primarily on patients using insulin for diabetes management, though is well suited for those that are DM1 or DM2. Patients on oral medications may see some features of benefit in this app and could still benefit from use.

This review was based on the free version available on iOS and not on subscription services offered via the app.

 

App’s Intended Use:

MySugr Logbook is a diabetes focused app allowing patients to record their lifestyle modifications and blood glucose measures throughout the day. This app integrates gamification mechanics allowing users to ‘tame’ their diabetic monster in the quest to better manage and track their disease.

 

Who’s this app most useful for?

The app will be beneficial primarily for patients looking to use an app to help estimate their A1c scores based on daily measurements of SMBG. That being the case, this app is focused primarily on patients using insulin for diabetes management, though is well suited for those that are DM1 or DM2. Patients on oral medications may see some features of benefit in this app and could still benefit from use.

 

How should one use it?

This app should be used by individuals with diabetes to track their blood glucose throughout the day to create a personalized approach to manage and assess their progress. The app allows users to track meals, blood glucose, insulin use (and oral medications – though this is not the main focus of the app), and other pertinent parameters important to those with diabetes.

 

Why should anyone use this app? Is it clinically relevant?

This app may be of high value to patients that enjoy an app with a high engagement profile that mySugr seeks to attain. By placing their ‘diabetes monster’ in front of the user, the app hopes to create a mechanism where the patient can visualize and keep their diabetes under control. The use of gamification mechanics may be of great value for such patients to help them visualize and understand their progress. Such methods in other clinical areas by reinforcing patient progress in a visual process has proven beneficial in studies, and as such this has potential.

 

Is there any published evidence that the app actually works?

No evidence; could not find any publications re: any testing/ validation of app.

 

Regulatory Compliance

Per the company: “mySugr Logbook is registered with the FDA as a risk class 1 medical device and carries similar regulatory approval in Europe. Additionally, the mySugr Bolus Calculator module received risk class IIb approval in Europe and launched there in December of 2015. That module is not available in the U.S. and has not been submitted to the FDA at this time. mySugr GmbH is also ISO 13485 certified.”

 

What is the most important/ desirable feature of the app?

This app shines in its engagement mechanics using gamification and reward system for users to track their progress with diabetes management and allows the data to be seen over a long length of time.

 

If there’s a paid version, is it worth the upgrade?

Did not evaluate the paid version.

Security and Privacy

Password: Yes
Encryption:
Data Security:
Data Sharing:
Regulatory Compliance:

Reviewer(s)
Timothy Aungst

Timothy Aungst, PharmD, is an assistant professor of pharmacy practice at MCPHS University. He graduated from Wilkes University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy and completed a PGY-1 Pharmacy Practice Residency at St. Luke's University Hospital, and then a Clinical Geriatric Fellowship at MCPHS University. He is passionate about the rise of technology in health care and its application to pharmacy. He has published primarily on the role of mobile technology and mHealth, and made multiple national and international presentations on those topics. He blogs at TheDigitalApothecary.com, and you can find him on Twitter @TDAungst.

Previous clinical contributor for Iodine, inc. Freelance writer for Pharmacy Times.

Maulik Majmudar

Dr. Maulik Majmudar is a practicing cardiologist and Associate Director of the Healthcare Transformation Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital; and an Instructor at Harvard Medical School. He lectures at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in areas of healthcare innovation & entrepreneurship, as well as medical device design and development. Dr. Majmudar started his career as a medical student at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, completed resident training in Internal Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and followed by a fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School. You can follow him @mmajmudar

Conflicts of Interest:

Employment: Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Consultant/ Advisor: AliveCor, BioFourmis, Cardiogram, EchoSense, Facebook, HUINNO, MC10, Nokia; Ownership: BioFourmis, Cardiogram, HiLabs, Quanttus; Research: EchoSense, GE Healthcare, MIT.

Editor(s)
Adam Landman

Dr. Adam Landman, is an emergency physician and Chief Medical Information Officer at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. Landman holds degrees in information systems and health care policy from Carnegie Mellon University and a medical degree from UMDNJ – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. After medical school, he trained in emergency medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed the RWJ Foundation Clinical Scholars fellowship in health services research, where he worked on qualitative and quantitative studies on the adoption of health information technology (HIT) in the emergency department (ED) and prehospital settings.

Conflicts of Interest:

Employment: Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Consultant/ Advisor: None; Ownership: None; Research: CRICO.

5 thoughts on “mySugr Diabetes Logbook”

  1. Thanks for the review, Timothy, Maulik, & Adam! We really appreciate you taking a look.

    If I may, I’d like to clarify that mySugr Logbook is registered with the FDA as a risk class 1 medical device and carries similar regulatory approval in Europe. Additionally, the mySugr Bolus Calculator module received risk class IIb approval in Europe and launched there in December of 2015. That module is not available in the U.S. and has not been submitted to the FDA at this time. mySugr GmbH is also ISO 13485 certified.

    Please let me know if you have any questions or if I can help with anything.

    Thanks again,
    Scott

  2. Good evening,
    I read this article on MobiHealth News: 2016-04-19 “Roche partners with mySugr for Accu-Chek, Logbook app integration: Users that own Roche’s Accu-Chek Connect meter will be able to automatically sync blood glucose data to mySugr. These users will also have access to the pro version of the mySugr app. This integrated offering will be available first in Germany and Austria, but will eventually launch in the US and other markets, according to the company.”
    Will this change anything in the review?
    Kind Regards
    Daniela (Italy)

    1. Thank you for the message. Once that feature/ functionality (integration) launches in the US, we would be happy to update the review; however, it doesn’t affect the clinical relevance, utility, or effectiveness of the mobile app. However, it does make it a lot easier for patients, as now, they won’t have to manually enter their blood glucose measurements each and every time.

  3. The app is really good i have experienced it two month ago and i have seen how good it is . Also app helped my father now he is well and healthy.

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